Correctional systems

Crewmen enter Bradley fighting vehicles at a US military base at an undisclosed location in Northeastern Syria, Monday, Nov. 11, 2019. The deployment of the mechanized force comes after US troops withdrew from northeastern Syria, making way for a Turkish offensive that began last month. (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)
November 12, 2019 - 5:26 am
A BASE IN EASTERN SYRIA (AP) — At a base in eastern Syria, a senior U.S. coalition commander said Monday that American troops who remain in Syria are redeploying to bases, including in some new locations, and working with the Kurdish-led forces to keep up the pressure on the Islamic State militants...
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Crewmen enter Bradley fighting vehicles at a US military base at an undisclosed location in Northeastern Syria, Monday, Nov. 11, 2019. The deployment of the mechanized force comes after US troops withdrew from northeastern Syria, making way for a Turkish offensive that began last month. (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)
November 11, 2019 - 4:59 pm
A BASE IN EASTERN SYRIA (AP) — At a base in eastern Syria, a senior U.S. coalition commander said Monday that American troops who remain in Syria are redeploying to bases, including in some new locations, and working with the Kurdish-led forces to keep up the pressure on the Islamic State militants...
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This undated photos shows Takuma Sakuragi. A court in southern China has sentenced the former Japanese politician to life in prison in a five-year-old drug trafficking case. Sakuragi was detained in 2013 when found carrying about 3.3 kilograms of illegal stimulants in his luggage, according to Japanese news reports. (Kyodo News via AP)
November 08, 2019 - 3:50 am
BEIJING (AP) — A court in southern China sentenced an elderly former Japanese politician to life in prison Friday for smuggling drugs in shoes packed inside a suitcase he was trying to take to his home country. A man from Mali was sentenced to death with a two-year reprieve and a Guinean received a...
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FILE - This combination image of undated photos released by the Monterey County Sheriff's Office shows Santos Fonseca, left, and Jonathan Salazar. The two murder suspects who escaped from a jail on California's central coast eluded an intense manhunt, traveled hundreds of miles and crossed into Mexico but were arrested trying to walk back into the United States, authorities said Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2019. (Monterey County Sheriff's Office via AP, File)
November 06, 2019 - 5:52 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Two murder suspects who escaped from a jail on California's central coast eluded an intense manhunt, traveled hundreds of miles and crossed into Mexico but were arrested trying to walk back into the United States, authorities said Wednesday. Jonathan Salazar, 20, and Santos...
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Tess Harjo, left, embraces her grandmother, Sally Taylor, right, after being released from the Eddie Warrior Correctional Center Monday, Nov. 4, 2019 in Taft, Okla. More than 450 inmates walked out the doors of prisons across Oklahoma on Monday as part of what state officials say is the largest single-day mass commutation in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
November 05, 2019 - 1:20 am
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — More than 450 inmates walked out the doors of prisons across Oklahoma on Monday as part of what state officials say is the largest single-day mass commutation in U.S. history. The release of inmates, all with convictions for low-level drug and property crimes, resulted from a...
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These undated photos provided by the Monterey County Sheriff's Office show inmates Santos Fonseca, left and Jonathan Salazar, right, who escaped from from Monterey County Jail Sunday, Nov. 3, 2019. Authorities say the two murder suspects have escaped from central California's Monterey County Jail. (Monterey County Sheriff's Office via AP)
November 04, 2019 - 2:24 pm
MONTEREY, Calif. (AP) — Officials on Monday were trying to find out how two men charged with murder were able to escape from a central California jail. The Monterey County Sheriff's Office warned that the fugitives should be considered dangerous but gave no other details on how they broke out of...
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FILE - In this Oct. 15, 2019, file photo, Nehemiah Griego appears during his sentencing hearing in Albuquerque, N.M. A man who shot and killed his parents and three young siblings as a juvenile in New Mexico has been sentenced to life in prison with the possibility of parole. Judge Alisa Hart issued 22-year-old Nehemiah Griego's long-awaited sentence Friday, Nov. 1, 2019, saying he could become eligible for parole after 30 years. Griego was 15 when authorities say he plotted the killings at his family's Albuquerque-area home. (Jim Thompson/The Albuquerque Journal via AP, File)
November 01, 2019 - 7:18 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A man convicted of fatally shooting his parents and three siblings in New Mexico as a 15-year-old was sentenced Friday to life in prison with the possibility of parole in a case that has tested the limits of mental treatment for juvenile offenders. Judge Alisa Hart...
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Connor Gorman of Davis, Calif., joins a rally on behalf of Cambodian refugee Tith Ton, who is awaiting parole from a murder conviction but could be deported to Cambodia, at the California Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., Friday, Nov. 1, 2019. Immigrant rights groups are calling on Gov. Gavin Newsom to end policies they say ease the transfer of prison inmates to federal authorities despite California's efforts to provide a sanctuary to those who are in the country illegally. (AP Photo/Don Thompson)
November 01, 2019 - 5:51 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Immigrant rights groups called Friday for Gov. Gavin Newsom to end policies they say ease the transfer of prison inmates to federal authorities despite California's efforts to provide a sanctuary to those who are in the country illegally. The groups asked Newsom to stop...
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Flags fly outside an entrance to the Idaho Correctional Alternative Placement Program facility, Friday, Nov. 1, 2019, in Kuna, Idaho. An inmate at the facility says a doctor with the private medical care company Corizon Health told him to wash and reuse his disposable urinary catheters — a complaint some inmate advocates say is common even though reusing the catheters can lead to health problems. The Idaho Department of Correction pays Tennessee-based Corizon Health roughly $46 million a year to provide inmate health care at all of the state's prisons, but officials recently decided to put the contract out to bid when the current term expires amid rising discomfort with the company. (AP Photo/Rebecca Boone)
November 01, 2019 - 4:03 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Brad Vanzant uses a wheelchair, has one kidney, and since 2015 has relied on catheters to drain his bladder. He's also an Idaho prison inmate, which means his medical supplies must be approved and provided by the state's private health care contractor, Corizon Health. So when a...
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October 30, 2019 - 4:35 pm
MADISON, Wis. (AP) — The man who kidnapped Wisconsin teen Jayme Closs and killed her parents got into a fight in a New Mexico prison with an inmate who asked about the case, showing how word of his crimes has spread and raising questions about whether moving him to an out-of-state lockup...
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