Court decisions

FILE - In this Friday, June 5, 2020 file photo Fraternal Order of Police President John Catanzara speaks to reporters outside the FOP lodge in Chicago. The Illinois Supreme Court says Chicago can keep all records of complaints about police officers no matter how old they are. The court ruled 6-1 on Thursday, June, 18, 2020, that state law trumps a provision of the police union's contract with the city that calls for records more than five years old to be destroyed. Catanzara was bitterly disappointed in the ruling, saying that preserving reports could hurt and haunt police officers in the city for years to come, whether or not they did anything wrong. (Tyler LaRiviere/Sun Times via AP, File)
June 18, 2020 - 3:57 pm
SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — The Illinois Supreme Court ruled Thursday that Chicago can keep all records of complaints against police officers that are more than five years old, delivering a victory for police reform advocates who say the records are crucial to keeping track of officers accused of...
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The Supreme Court is seen in Washington, early Monday, June 15, 2020. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
June 18, 2020 - 2:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — In two major decisions this week on LGBT rights and immigration, the conservative-leaning Supreme Court handed President Donald Trump somewhat surprising defeats. “Do you get the impression that the Supreme Court doesn’t like me?” Trump tweeted shortly after the court ruled...
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Workers for The Virginia Department of General Services install concrete barriers around the statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee on Monument Avenue Wednesday June 17, 2020, in Richmond, Va. The barriers are intended to protect the safety of demonstrators as well as the structure itself. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
June 18, 2020 - 12:19 pm
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — A judge on Thursday indefinitely extended an injunction preventing the Virginia governor from removing a historic statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee from a famed avenue in the former capital of the Confederacy. Richmond Circuit Court Judge Bradley Cavedo made the decision after...
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FILE - In this June 30, 2019, file photo parade-goers carrying rainbow flags walk down a street during the LBGTQ Pride march in New York, to celebrate five decades of LGBTQ pride, marking the 50th anniversary of the police raid that sparked the modern-day gay rights movement. Democrats flooded Twitter and email inboxes this week with praise for the watershed Supreme Court decision shielding gay, lesbian and transgender people from job discrimination. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E, File)
June 17, 2020 - 12:30 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats flooded Twitter and email inboxes this week with praise for the watershed Supreme Court decision shielding gay, lesbian and transgender people from job discrimination. Republicans — not so much. The court's 6-3 ruling came just two days after an event that played out in...
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June 16, 2020 - 1:12 pm
HELENA, Mont. (AP) — The Trump administration has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to revive a permit program that would allow the disputed Keystone XL pipeline and other new oil and gas pipelines to cross waterways with little review. Earlier this year, a Montana judge suspended the U.S. Army Corps of...
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Rappler CEO and Executive Editor Maria Ressa gestures during a press conference in Manila, Philippines on Monday June 15, 2020. Ressa, an award-winning journalist critical of the Philippine president, her online news site Rappler Inc. and Santos were convicted of libel and sentenced to jail Monday in a decision called a major blow to press freedom in an Asian bastion of democracy. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
June 15, 2020 - 1:45 am
MANILA, Philippines (AP) — An award-winning journalist critical of the Philippine president was convicted of libel and sentenced to jail Monday in a decision called a major blow to press freedom in an Asian bastion of democracy. The Manila court found Maria Ressa of the online news site Rappler Inc...
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Alexander Martinez's family and friends play music at his graveside during his funeral in Acatlan de Perez Figueroa, Mexico, Thursday, June 11, 2020. Hundreds of residents of this town in southern Mexico bid farewell amid anger and tears to Alexander Martinez, a 16-year-old Mexican-American boy shot dead by local police. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)
June 13, 2020 - 3:06 pm
MEXICO CITY (AP) — A Mexican judge on Saturday ordered a police officer who fatally shot a 16-year-old Mexican-American boy to be held in preventive detention while he is investigated for alleged murder. The boy, Alexander Martínez Gómez, was shot in the head by a police officer in southern Mexico...
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A protester holds a sign that reads "Abolish Police" during a "Silent March" against racial inequality and police brutality that was organized by Black Lives Matter Seattle-King County, Friday, June 12, 2020, in Seattle. Hundreds of people marched for nearly two miles to support Black lives, oppose racism and to call for police reforms among other issues. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
June 12, 2020 - 8:14 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — A U.S. judge on Friday ordered Seattle police to temporarily stop using tear gas, pepper spray and flash-bang devices to break up largely peaceful protests, a victory for groups who say authorities have overreacted to recent demonstrations over police brutality and racial injustice...
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Women take a selfie at a park in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, June 11, 2020. Just weeks ago South Korea was celebrating its hard-won gains against the coronavirus. It was easing social distancing measures, reopening schools and promoting its tech-driven methods of fighting the spread of the virus. But the country’s success story is being threatened by a resurgence of infections in the area around Seoul where half of South Korea’s 51 million people live. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
June 11, 2020 - 9:59 pm
SEOUL, South Korea — South Korea is reporting 56 new cases of COVID-19 as the country continues to see a resurgence of the virus concentrated in the capital area. Figures released by South Korea’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday brought national totals to 12,003 cases and 277...
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FILE- In this June 1, 2020, file photo hair stylist Zak Moukhtabir works on the hair of Cheyenne Foster at the Georgetown Salon & Spa in Washington. The Trump administration does not have to issue an emergency rule requiring employers to protect workers from the coronavirus, a federal appeals court ruled Thursday, June 11. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
June 11, 2020 - 7:02 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration does not have to issue an emergency rule requiring employers to protect workers from the coronavirus, a federal appeals court ruled Thursday. The unanimous ruling by a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit...
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