Floods

In this Wednesday, March 27, 2019, photo, Daniel Barrett, right, of Red Lake, Minn., strikes a pose while he and Devan Keezer, of White Earth, Minn., fill sandbags in Fargo, N.D. Volunteers from around the region are coming to help the city fill bags to protect itself against possible major flooding from spring runoff in mid-April. The city wants to fill 1 million sandbags within the next two weeks. (AP Photo/Dave Kolpack)
March 29, 2019 - 1:52 pm
FARGO, N.D. (AP) — North Dakota's largest city is back in the sandbag-filling business with a new crop of volunteers after a five-year break from warding off major Red River floods. Fargo officials this week reactivated Sandbag Central, converting a building that normally houses garbage trucks into...
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FILE - This March 17, 2019 file photo provided by the U.S. Air Force shows an aerial view of Offutt Air Force Base and surrounding areas in Nebraska affected by flood waters. After this spring's massive flooding along the Missouri River, many want to blame the agency that manages the river's dams for making the disaster worse, but it may not be that simple. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says much of the water that created this month's flooding came from rain and melting snow that flowed into the river downstream of all the dams, and at the same time, massive amounts of water filled the reservoirs and some had to be released. (Tech. Sgt. Rachelle Blake/U.S. Air Force via AP, File)
March 28, 2019 - 7:36 pm
OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — After this spring's massive flooding along the Missouri River, many want to blame the agency that manages the river's dams for making the disaster worse, but it may not be that simple. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says much of the water that created the flooding came from...
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In this Monday, March 25, 2019 photo, standing water pools in a field near Loneman, S.D., on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, following spring flooding. (Ryan Hermens/Rapid City Journal via AP)
March 28, 2019 - 6:06 pm
Record-breaking flooding has forced dozens of people on a South Dakota reservation to evacuate and ranchers were working Thursday to get their livestock to higher ground while waiting for a river to crest. High water from the Moreau River is threatening about 50 residences in an 8-mile (12.8-...
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Larry Poell, who lives on top of a Superfund site in Mead, Neb., adjusts Wednesday, March 27, 2019, the overalls of his granddaughter, while visiting a flood relief shelter in Ashland. Poell said federal officials have always maintained that the contaminated plumes are stable, but he wonders if the floodwater caused them to shift. "I'm concerned about it, I think everybody's concerned about it," he said. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
March 28, 2019 - 1:22 pm
MEAD, Neb. (AP) — Flooding in the Midwest temporarily cut off a Superfund site in Nebraska that stores radioactive waste and explosives, inundated another one storing toxic chemical waste in Missouri, and limited access to others, according to federal regulators. The Environmental Protection Agency...
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March 27, 2019 - 11:52 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Air Force says it will need nearly $5 billion over the next three years to rebuild a Florida base heavily damaged by Hurricane Michael last fall and repair a base in Nebraska struck by flooding this month. The estimate was disclosed Wednesday by Air Force Secretary Heather...
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Beira Mayor Daviz Simango, right, pauses from directing disaster relief operations in Beira, Mozambique, Monday March 25, 2019. Simango dreamed about protecting his people from climate change with much of the city being below sea level on a coastline that experts call one of the world's most vulnerable to global warming's rising waters. (AP Photo/Cara Anna)
March 27, 2019 - 8:43 am
BEIRA, Mozambique (AP) — Long before Cyclone Idai roared in and tore apart Mozambique's seaside city of Beira, the mayor dreamed of protecting his people from climate change. It would be a huge challenge. Large parts of the city of 500,000 residents are below sea level on a coastline that experts...
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Displaced families set up their bedding on top of the roof in Buzi district, 200 kilometers (120 miles) outside Beira, Mozambique, on Saturday, March 23, 2019. A second week has begun with efforts to find and help some tens of thousands of people in devastated parts of southern Africa, with some hundreds dead and an unknown number of people still missing. (AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)
March 24, 2019 - 7:41 am
BEIRA, Mozambique (AP) — Cyclone Idai's death toll has risen above 750 in the three southern African countries hit 10 days ago by the storm, as workers restore electricity, water and try to prevent outbreak of cholera, authorities said Sunday. In Mozambique the number of dead has risen to 446 while...
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An angel statuary graces a yard near Hansen Lake Friday, March 22, 2019, in Bellevue, Neb. Residents were allowed into the area for the first time since floodwaters overtook several homes. Flooding in Nebraska has caused an estimated $1.4 billion in damage. The state received Trump's federal disaster assistance approval on Thursday. (Kent Sievers/Omaha World-Herald via AP)
March 23, 2019 - 4:39 pm
ST. LOUIS (AP) — Even as floodwaters receded in hard-hit places in in the Midwest, experts warned Saturday that with plenty of snow still left to melt in northern states, the relief may only be temporary. Rainfall and some snowmelt spurred flooding in recent weeks that's blamed in three deaths so...
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A man passes through a section of the road damaged by Cyclone Idai in Nhamatanda about 50 kilometres from Beira, in Mozambique, Friday March, 22, 2019. As flood waters began to recede in parts of Mozambique on Friday, fears rose that the death toll could soar as bodies are revealed. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)
March 22, 2019 - 6:33 pm
BEIRA, Mozambique (AP) — With the flooding easing in parts of cyclone-stricken Mozambique on Friday, fears are rising that the waters could yield up many more bodies. The confirmed number of people killed in Mozambique and neighboring Zimbabwe and Malawi climbed past 600. Eight days after Cyclone...
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FILE - In this Jan. 26, 2019 file photo, Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, speaks during a town hall meeting, in Primghar, Iowa. King says he was told that victims of Hurricane Katrina only asked for help, unlike Iowans. King told his constituents Thursday that as New Orleans recovered from the 2005 storm, someone from FEMA told him that “everybody’s looking around saying, who’s gonna help me, who’s gonna help me?” In contrast, King said, “Iowans take care of each other.” New Orleans is mostly black. Iowa is mostly white. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
March 22, 2019 - 3:15 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican Steve King says he was told that victims of Hurricane Katrina only asked for help, unlike people in his home state of Iowa, who "take care of each other." The Iowa congressman on Thursday told a town hall meeting in Charter Oak he visited New Orleans multiple times...
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