Immigration policy

FILE - This Feb. 5, 2018, file photo shows the seal of the Board of Governors of the United States Federal Reserve System at the Marriner S. Eccles Federal Reserve Board Building in Washington. Judy Shelton, President Donald Trump's nominee to the Federal Reserve touted her credentials in written testimony Thursday, Feb. 13, 2020, and said she would “work collegially” if approved. She will likely face tough questioning by the Senate Banking Committee Thursday, which is considering her nomination. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
February 13, 2020 - 2:17 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — One of President Donald Trump's nominees for the Federal Reserve came under sharp questioning Thursday from senators over her unorthodox economic views, including from two Republicans whose doubts about her nomination could imperil it. The nominee, Judy Shelton, sought to make her...
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Senate Banking Committee Chairman Sen. Mike Crapo, R-Idaho, left, talks with ranking member Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, right, during a hearing with Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 12, 2020. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
February 12, 2020 - 11:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — One of President Donald Trump's nominees for the Federal Reserve will likely face skeptical questioning from a Senate committee Thursday over her unconventional economic views. Trump has nominated Judy Shelton for the Fed's Board of Governors, a position with significant influence...
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FILE - In this Feb. 25, 2019 file photo, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks during a bill signing ceremony in New York. Cuomo says his state will file a lawsuit challenging the Trump administration's plan to block New Yorkers from enrolling in "trusted traveler" programs. Federal officials say they took the step because of a new New York law barring immigrant agents from getting access to state motor vehicle records. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
February 12, 2020 - 10:32 am
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York's governor plans to propose to President Donald Trump that the state could share some driving records with federal immigration agencies if the administration reverses its move to block state residents from Global Entry and other programs that allow travelers to avoid...
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Attorney General William Barr waves as he walks on stage to speak at the National Sheriffs' Association Winter Legislative and Technology Conference in Washington, Monday, Feb. 10, 2020. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
February 10, 2020 - 11:44 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department ratcheted up legal pressure Monday on local governments over “sanctuary” policies that hinder federal immigration officers, bringing two new lawsuits and launching a coordinated messaging campaign to highlight an election-year priority of President Donald...
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February 07, 2020 - 7:34 pm
SAN DIEGO (AP) — A federal judge has prohibited U.S. immigration authorities from relying on databases deemed faulty to ask law enforcement agencies to hold people in custody, a setback for the Trump administration that threatens to hamper how it carries out arrests. The ruling applies only to the...
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February 07, 2020 - 12:41 pm
ALABNY, N.Y. (AP) — New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Friday that the state will file a lawsuit challenging the Department of Homeland Security's decision to block New Yorkers from participating “trusted traveler programs” in retribution for a new state law that could hinder federal immigration...
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FILE - In this Aug. 14, 2019 file photo, The Statue of Liberty is shown in New York. The Department of Homeland Security says New York residents will be cut off from ‘trusted traveler’ programs because of a state law that prevents immigration officials from accessing motor vehicle records. Acting Deputy DHS Secretary Ken Cuccinelli says tens of thousands of New Yorkers will be inconvenienced by the action. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)
February 06, 2020 - 1:13 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — New York residents will be cut off from “trusted traveler” programs that enable people to quickly return from outside the country because of a new state law that prevents immigration officials from accessing motor vehicle records, a senior Homeland Security official said Thursday...
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FILE - In this Nov. 29, 2019 file photo, Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador listens to questions during his daily morning press conference at the National Palace in Mexico City. Shortly before taking office Lopez Obrador decided to create an army of volunteers dubbed the “servants of the nation,” to canvass people who receive government benefits collecting their personal information in part to see if they might be eligible for yet more help from various programs promised during the campaign for the likes of farmers, the disabled, unemployed youth and the elderly. The effort alarmed opposition political parties who saw it as an attempt to illegally use public funds to promote López Obrador and his leftist Morena party. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte, File)
January 31, 2020 - 12:35 pm
MEXICO CITY (AP) — President Andrés Manuel López Obrador said Friday that he expects more caravans of Central American migrants and asylum seekers to emerge, but he sees the phenomenon which became a political football in the United States in recent years as waning. A week after armored National...
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In this July 10, 2019, photo, Juan Carlos Perla carries his youngest son, Joshua Mateo Perla, as the family leaves their home in Tijuana, Mexico, for an asylum hearing in San Diego. They were among the first sent back to Mexico under a Trump administration policy that dramatically reshaped the scene at the U.S.-Mexico border by returning migrants to Mexico to wait out their U.S. asylum process. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
January 30, 2020 - 12:37 pm
TIJUANA, Mexico (AP) — The Perla family of El Salvador has slipped into a daily rhythm in Mexico while they wait for the U.S. to decide whether to grant them asylum. A modest home has replaced the tent they lived in at a migrant shelter. Their 7- and 5-year-old boys are in their second year of...
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FILE - In this June 17, 2019 file photo, The Supreme Court in Washington. A divided Supreme Court is allowing the Trump administration to put in place a policy connecting the use of public benefits with whether immigrants could become permanent residents. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
January 27, 2020 - 4:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A divided Supreme Court on Monday allowed the Trump administration to put in place new rules that could jeopardize permanent resident status for immigrants who use food stamps, Medicaid and housing vouchers. Under the new policy, immigration officials can deny green cards to legal...
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