Intellectual property

FILE - In this Oct. 25, 2017 file photo, artist Don Henley performs at "All In For The Gambler: Kenny Rogers' Farewell Concert Celebration" at Bridgestone Arena in Nashville, Tenn. Henley is urging Congress to “Take It to the Limit” to protect artists against online pirating. He's wading into a copyright fight pitting Hollywood and the recording industry against big tech platforms like Google’s YouTube. (Photo by Laura Roberts/Invision/AP, File)
June 02, 2020 - 7:19 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Eagles songwriter Don Henley urged Congress on Tuesday to “Take It to the Limit” to protect artists against online pirating, wading into a copyright fight pitting Hollywood and the recording industry against big tech platforms like Google’s YouTube. The blockbuster hitmaker of the...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, file photo, Maryland guard Jaylen Brantley walks on the court in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game against Minnesota, in College Park, Md. A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit in which two former University of Maryland men’s basketball players accused makers of the “Fortnite” video game of misappropriating a dance move that the ex-teammates popularized. U.S. District Judge Paul Grimm in Maryland ruled FridayMay 29, 2020, that the Copyright Act preempts claims that Jared Nickens and Jaylen Brantley filed in February 2019 against Epic Games Inc., creator of the wildly popular online shooting game. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
June 01, 2020 - 8:02 pm
SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit in which two former University of Maryland men’s basketball players accused makers of the “Fortnite” video game of misappropriating a dance move that the ex-teammates popularized. U.S. District Judge Paul Grimm in Maryland ruled...
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June 01, 2020 - 8:56 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Four of the country's biggest publishers have sued a digital library for copyright infringement, alleging that the Internet Archive has illegally offered more than a million scanned works to the public, including such favorites as Toni Morrison's “Song of Solomon,” Malcolm Gladwell'...
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In this May 3, 2020 photo, the setting sun shines on the Supreme Court building on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Supreme Court is getting ready for its second day of telephone arguments. Its first day of arguments over the phone with audio available live for the first time went off largely without a hitch Monday. There were some minor glitches. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
May 05, 2020 - 9:37 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is hearing a second day of arguments by telephone with the audio available live to audiences around the world. You can listen live here starting at 10 a.m. Eastern. Monday was the justices' first foray into the setup they settled on because of the coronavirus...
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Attorney Erica Ross poses for a portrait, Monday, May 4, 2020, outside the Department of Justice in Washington, after Ross became the first attorney to argue in the first arguments that the Supreme Court has argued via telephone. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
The Associated Press
May 04, 2020 - 10:39 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — They politely took turns speaking. Not a child, spouse or dog could be heard in the background. The conference call went long, but not by that much. And with that, the Supreme Court made history Monday, hearing arguments by telephone and allowing the world to listen in live, both...
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FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2018, file photo, the justices of the U.S. Supreme Court gather for a formal group portrait to include the new Associate Justice, top row, far right, at the Supreme Court building in Washington. Seated from left: Associate Justice Stephen Breyer, Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, Chief Justice of the United States John G. Roberts, Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Associate Justice Samuel Alito Jr. Standing behind from left: Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch, Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Associate Justice Elena Kagan and Associate Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh. On Monday, May 4, 2020, the Supreme Court for the first time audio of court's arguments will be heard live by the world and the first arguments by telephone. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
May 04, 2020 - 11:00 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The coronavirus pandemic has forced the tradition-bound Supreme Court into some big changes. Starting Monday, the justices are hearing arguments by telephone for the first time. The court will hear a total of 10 cases over six days, including President Donald Trump’s bid to keep...
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April 27, 2020 - 4:14 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court ruled Monday against the state of Georgia in a copyright lawsuit over annotations to its legal code, finding they cannot be copyrighted. The 5-4 ruling splintered the court along unusual lines and upholds a previous appeals court decision. “The Copyright Act...
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March 09, 2020 - 1:12 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A federal appeals court on Monday restored a jury verdict that found Led Zeppelin did not steal “Stairway to Heaven." The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco handed the major win to guitarist Jimmy Page and singer Robert Plant and dealt a blow to the estate of...
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FILE - In this Oct. 31, 2019, file photo, a man uses his smartphone as he stands near a billboard for Chinese technology firm Huawei at the PT Expo in Beijing. The Justice Department has added new criminal charges against Chinese tech giant Huawei and two of its United States subsidiaries, accusing the company in a plot to steal trade secrets. The indictment from federal prosecutors was announced Thursday by federal prosecutors in Brooklyn. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)
February 14, 2020 - 2:52 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department has added new criminal charges against Chinese tech giant Huawei and several subsidiaries, accusing the company of a brazen scheme to steal trade secrets from competitors in America, federal prosecutors announced Thursday. The new indictment also alleges the...
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FILE - This Thursday, March 12, 2009, file photo shows Gilead Sciences Inc. headquarters in Foster City, Calif. Scientists in the city at the center of China’s virus outbreak have applied to patent a drug made by U.S. company Gilead Science Inc. to treat the disease, possibly fueling more of the conflict over technology policy that helped trigger Washington’s tariff war with Beijing. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)
February 06, 2020 - 12:47 pm
BEIJING (AP) — Scientists in the city at the center of China’s virus outbreak have applied to patent a drug made by U.S. company Gilead Sciences Inc. to treat the disease, possibly fueling conflict over technology policy that helped trigger Washington’s tariff war with Beijing. The government-run...
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