National governments

Protesters on boats oppose as workers of Japan's central government resumed work at a disputed U.S. military base relocation site on the southern island of Okinawa, at Henoko in Nago city, Okinawa prefecture, Japan, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018. The Defense Ministry's local branch said an early stage of landfill work at Henoko on Okinawa's east coast began Thursday morning.(Koji Harada/Kyodo News via AP)
October 31, 2018 - 11:56 pm
TOKYO (AP) — Japan's central government resumed work at a disputed U.S. military base relocation site on Thursday even though Okinawa residents see the project as an undemocratic imposition on the small southern island. An early stage of landfill work at Henoko on Okinawa's east coast began...
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October 31, 2018 - 6:58 pm
MIAMI (AP) — The former finance chief of Venezuela's state oil company pleaded guilty Wednesday to participating in an alleged $1.2 billion embezzlement scheme, a major breakthrough for U.S. prosecutors targeting corruption by people close to President Nicolas Maduro, including his stepsons...
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In this Oct. 23, 2018 photo, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks to reporters at a news conference at the State Department in Washington. The Trump administration is calling for a halt to the civil war in Yemen, including airstrikes by the Arab-led coalition supported by the United States. Pompeo is urging all parties to support U.N. Special Envoy Martin Griffiths in what Pompeo says must be "substantive consultations" in November in a third country. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
October 31, 2018 - 6:22 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — At an apparent turning point in one of its hardest foreign policy challenges, the Trump administration is demanding a cease-fire and the launch of U.N.-led political talks to end the Saudi-Iran proxy war in Yemen. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis called for a halt to hostilities...
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FILE - In this Oct. 24, 2018, file photo, Delaine Belgarde, right, shows the new Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa ID she received free of charge on Oct. 24, 2018, in Belcourt, N.D. It will allow her to vote in November under recently tightened state voter ID rules. The four large American Indian tribes in North Dakota are providing free identification to thousands of members in advance of Tuesday's election. The effort comes in the wake of a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling allowing the state to continue requiring street addresses on IDs, as opposed to other addresses such as post office boxes. Streets addresses aren't important on reservations, and some feel the rule could disenfranchise thousands of Native American voters. (AP Photo/Blake Nicholson, File)
October 31, 2018 - 2:15 pm
BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — The four large American Indian tribes in North Dakota are providing free identification to thousands of members in advance of Tuesday's election. The effort comes in the wake of a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling allowing the state to continue requiring street addresses on IDs...
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October 31, 2018 - 1:58 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court struggled Wednesday over what to do about an $8.5 million class-action settlement involving Google and privacy concerns in which all the money went to lawyers and nonprofit groups but nothing was paid to 129 million people who used Google to perform internet...
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October 31, 2018 - 12:54 pm
ATLANTA (AP) — In a story Oct. 30 about concerns over mailed ballots being rejected by election officials for various reasons, The Associated Press reported erroneously where a New Hampshire woman dropped off her absentee ballot. It was at her town clerk's office, not her county office. A corrected...
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FILE - In this May 8, 2001 file photo, Chief Justice of the United States William Rehnquist addresses a meeting of the Federal Justices Association in Arlington, Va. NPR’s “Morning Edition” reports author Evan Thomas found Rehnquist’s letter to Sandra Day O’Connor while researching his upcoming book, “First.” The two dated while students at Stanford Law School in the early 1950s. They had broken up, but remained friends. Rehnquist graduated and in a March 29 letter, wrote: "To be specific, Sandy, will you marry me this summer?" She said no. (AP Photo/Hillery Smith Garrison, File)
October 31, 2018 - 9:16 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A biographer has discovered the future chief justice of the United States once proposed marriage to the woman who would become the first woman to serve on the court. NPR's "Morning Edition" reports author Evan Thomas found William Rehnquist's letter to Sandra Day O'Connor while...
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Austria's Chancellor Sebastian Kurz, Austrian Vice Chancellor Heinz-Christian Strache and Austrian President Alexander Van Der Bellen, from left, review recruits on the occasion of national holiday celebrations at Vienna's Heldenplatz, Austria, Friday, Oct. 26, 2018. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)
October 31, 2018 - 6:48 am
BERLIN (AP) — The Austrian government said Wednesday that it won't sign a global compact to promote safe and orderly migration, citing concerns about national sovereignty as it joined neighboring Hungary in shunning the agreement. Conservative Chancellor Sebastian Kurz took office last December in...
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FILE - In this Nov. 20, 2010, file photo, Asia Bibi, a Pakistani Christian woman, listens to officials at a prison in Sheikhupura near Lahore, Pakistan. Pakistan's top court on Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018, acquitted Bibi who was sentenced to death in 2010 on blasphemy charges, a landmark ruling that could ignite mass protests or violence by hard-line Islamists. (AP Photo, File)
October 31, 2018 - 3:15 am
ISLAMABAD (AP) — Pakistan's top court on Wednesday acquitted a Christian woman who was sentenced to death on blasphemy charges in 2010, a landmark ruling that sparked protests by hard-line Islamists and raised fears of violence. Chief Justice Mian Saqib Nisar announced the verdict to a packed...
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South Korean Lee Chun-sik, a 94-year-old victim of forced labor during Japan's colonial rule of the Korean Peninsula before the end of World War II, gestures upon his arrival at the Supreme Court in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2018. In a potentially far-reaching decision, South Korea's Supreme Court ruled that a Japanese steelmaker should compensate four South Koreans for forced labor during Japan's colonial rule of the Korean Peninsula before the end of World War II. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)
October 30, 2018 - 7:47 pm
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — In a potentially far-reaching decision, South Korea's Supreme Court ruled that a major Japanese steelmaker should compensate four South Koreans for forced labor during Japan's colonial rule of the Korean Peninsula before the end of World War II. The long-awaited ruling,...
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