National governments

Russian President Vladimir Putin shows his passport to a member of an election commission as he arrives to take part in voting at a polling station in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, July 1, 2020. The vote on the constitutional amendments that would reset the clock on Russian President Vladimir Putin's tenure and enable him to serve two more six-year terms is set to wrap up Wednesday. (Alexei Druzhinin, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)
July 01, 2020 - 3:20 pm
MOSCOW (AP) — Russian voters approved changes to the constitution that will allow President Vladimir Putin to potentially hold power until 2036, but the weeklong plebiscite that concluded Wednesday was tarnished by widespread reports of pressure on voters and other irregularities. With 55% of all...
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Police detain protesters against the new security law during a march marking the anniversary of the Hong Kong handover from Britain to China, Wednesday, July. 1, 2020, in Hong Kong. Hong Kong marked the 23rd anniversary of its handover to China in 1997 just one day after China enacted a national security law that cracks down on protests in the territory. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
July 01, 2020 - 10:04 am
HONG KONG (AP) — Hong Kong police made the first arrests Wednesday under a new national security law imposed by China’s central government, as thousands of people defied tear gas and pepper pellets to protest against the contentious move on the anniversary of the former British colony's handover to...
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The U.S. Supreme Court is seen Tuesday, June 30, 2020 in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
June 30, 2020 - 5:07 pm
The Supreme Court elated religious freedom advocates and alarmed secular groups with its Tuesday ruling on public funding for religious education, a decision whose long-term effect on the separation of church and state remains to be seen. In Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue, the high court...
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FILE - In this March 6, 2018, file photo, Russian President Vladimir Putin listens to employees of Uralvagonzavod factory in Nizhny Tagil, Russia. In 2011, Nizhny Tagil - an industrial city some 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow - was nicknamed “Putingrad” for its residents' fervent support of the president. Now, however, workers who once defended Putin are speaking out against the constitutional reforms that would allow him to stay in office until 2036. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko, File)
June 30, 2020 - 6:51 am
NIZHNY TAGIL, Russia (AP) — In 2011, the industrial city of Nizhny Tagil was dubbed “Putingrad” for its residents’ fervent support for Russian President Vladimir Putin. Nine years later, it appears the city 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow no longer lives up to that nickname. Workers are...
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FILE - In this file photo, Dec. 19, 2019, Russian President Vladimir Putin leaves his annual news conference in Moscow, Russia. Putin is just a step away from bringing about the constitutional changes that would allow him to extend his rule until 2036. The vote that would reset the clock on Putin’s tenure in office and allow him to serve two more six-year terms is set to wrap up Wednesday, July 1, 2020. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin, File)
June 30, 2020 - 6:39 am
MOSCOW (AP) — Russian President Vladimir Putin is just a step away from completing his main political project of the year — constitutional changes that would allow him to extend his rule until 2036. A nationwide plebiscite on the amendments that would reset the clock on Putin’s tenure and enable...
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The Supreme Court is seen on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, June 29, 2020. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
June 30, 2020 - 4:23 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Supporters of abortion rights are elated, foes of abortion dismayed and angry, but they agree on one consequence of the Supreme Court’s first major abortion ruling since President Donald Trump took office: The upcoming election is crucial to their cause. Both sides also say Monday’s...
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In this Friday, June 26, 2020 photo, U.S. District Judge Laurie Michelson, left, administers the Aath of Citizenship to Hala Baqtar during a drive-thru naturalization service in a parking structure at the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services headquarters on Detroit's east side. The ceremony is a way to continue working as the federal courthouse is shut down due to Coronavirus. The U.S. has resumed swearing in new citizens but the oath ceremonies aren't the same because of COVID-19 and a budget crisis at the citizenship agency threatens to stall them again. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)
June 29, 2020 - 11:19 pm
DETROIT (AP) — A 60-year-old U.K. citizen drove into a Detroit parking garage on a recent afternoon, lowered the window of her SUV to swear an oath, and left as a newly minted American. It took less than 30 minutes. Anita Rosenberger is among thousands of people around the country who have taken...
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The sun rises behind the Supreme Court on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, June 29, 2020. The Supreme Court has refused to block the execution of four federal prison inmates who are scheduled to be put to death in July and August. The executions would mark the first use of the death penalty on the federal level since 2003. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
June 29, 2020 - 10:27 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday refused to block the execution of four federal prison inmates who are scheduled to be put to death in July and August. The executions would mark the first use of the death penalty on the federal level since 2003. The justices rejected an appeal from...
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The sun rises behind the Supreme Court on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, June 29, 2020. The Supreme Court has refused to block the execution of four federal prison inmates who are scheduled to be put to death in July and August. The executions would mark the first use of the death penalty on the federal level since 2003. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
June 29, 2020 - 5:06 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — In a ruling underscoring the power of the president, the Supreme Court on Monday made it easier for the president to fire the head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. The justices struck down restrictions Congress had written on when the president can remove the bureau’s...
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FILE - In this Jan. 16, 2020, file photo Chief Justice of the United States, John Roberts walks to the Senate chamber at the Capitol in Washington. Roberts told graduating seniors at his son's high school that the coronavirus has “pierced our illusion of certainty and control" and counseled them to make their way in a world turned upside down with humility, compassion and courage. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
June 29, 2020 - 3:29 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The biggest cases of the Supreme Court term so far have a surprising common thread. On a court with five Republican appointees, the liberal justices have been in the majority in rulings that make workplace discrimination against gay and transgender people illegal, protect young...
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