Naturalization

In this Sept. 18, 2018 photo new American citizens stand during a naturalization ceremony in Los Angeles. More than 700,000 immigrants are waiting on their applications to become U.S. citizens, a process that in many parts of the country now takes a year or more. The number of aspiring Americans surged during 2016, jumping 27 percent from a year ago as Donald Trump made cracking down on immigration a central point of his presidential campaign. (AP Photo/Amy Taxin)
October 28, 2018 - 11:05 am
LOS ANGELES (AP) — More than 700,000 immigrants are waiting on applications to become U.S. citizens, a process that once typically took about six months but has stretched to more than two years in some places. The long wait times developed after President Donald Trump took office, and some...
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Seattle Mariners pitcher Felix Hernandez is sworn in as a U.S. citizen at the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Field office in Tukwila, Wash., on Monday, Sept. 24, 2018. (Mike Siegel/ The Seattle Times via AP)
September 24, 2018 - 7:54 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Mariners teammates stood and applauded and "God Bless America" played on speakers when Felix Hernandez entered Seattle's clubhouse after becoming a U.S. citizen. A native of Venezuela, the 32-year-old pitcher passed his citizenship interview Monday and was among 74 people from 36...
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Viktor and Amalija Knavs listen as their attorney makes a statement in New York, Thursday, Aug. 9, 2018. First lady Melania Trump's parents have been sworn in as U.S. citizens. A lawyer for the Knavs says the Slovenian couple took the citizenship oath on Thursday in New York City. They had been living in the U.S. as permanent residents. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
August 09, 2018 - 3:53 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — First lady Melania Trump's parents were sworn in as U.S. citizens on Thursday, completing a legal path to citizenship that their son-in-law has suggested eliminating. Viktor and Amalija Knavs, both in their 70s, took the citizenship oath at a private ceremony in New York City. The...
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FILE - In this July 3, 2018, file photo, a Pakistani recruit, 22, who was recently discharged from the U.S. Army, holds an American flag as he poses for a picture. The U.S. Army has stopped discharging immigrant recruits who enlisted seeking a path to citizenship - at least temporarily. A memo shared with The Associated Press on Wednesday, Aug. 8 and dated July 20 spells out orders to high-ranking Army officials to stop processing discharges of men and women who enlisted in the special immigrant program, effective immediately. (AP Photo/Mike Knaak, File)
August 09, 2018 - 6:53 am
The U.S. Army has stopped discharging immigrant recruits who enlisted seeking a path to citizenship — at least temporarily. A memo shared with The Associated Press on Wednesday and dated July 20 spells out orders to high-ranking Army officials to stop processing discharges of men and women who...
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In this release by Chiang Rai Public Relations Office, Mongkol Boonpiam, left, receives an identity card denoting Thai citizenship from Somsak Kunkam Sheriff of Mae Sai during a ceremony in Mae Sai district, Chiang Rai province, northern Thailand, Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2018. Mongkol Boonpiam, Adul Samon, and Pornchai Khamluang, three of the young soccer players players who had been trapped for almost three weeks in a cave in northern Thailand —— and 25-year-old assistant coach Ekapol Chanthawon, who had been with them, had been stateless, their lack of citizenship not only restricting their upward mobility, but even their right to travel outside of Chiang Rai, the northern province where they live. A fifth boy on their Wild Boars soccer team who was not in the cave but had applied for citizenship was also granted it. (Chiang Rai Public Relations Office via AP)
August 08, 2018 - 7:56 pm
BANGKOK (AP) — Three young soccer players and their coach, who were rescued with other teammates after almost three weeks in a flooded cave, were granted Thai citizenship on Wednesday. All four had been stateless, and their lack of citizenship deprived them of some basic benefits and rights,...
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CORRECTS AGE TO 39-Alejandra Juarez,39, left, says goodbye to her children, Pamela and Estela at the Orlando International Airport on Friday, Aug. 3, 2018 in Orlando, Fla. Juarez, the wife of a former Marine is preparing to self-deport to Mexico in a move that would split up their family. (Red Huber/Orlando Sentinel via AP)
August 03, 2018 - 1:15 pm
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — The 16-year-old American daughter of a U.S. Marine held back tears as long as she could Friday before her family was split in two. Her mother, Alejandra Juarez, was finally leaving for Mexico, rather than be sent off in handcuffs, after exhausting all options to stop her...
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Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz. speaks on May 29, 2018, at the Capitol in Phoenix. Sinema has come a long way from her days as a green party activist as she seeks to become the first Democrat to represent Arizona in the Senate in 30 years. (AP Photo/Matt York)
July 22, 2018 - 8:32 am
PHOENIX (AP) — Democratic Rep. Kyrsten Sinema says Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the agency that some in her party are clamoring to abolish, is performing an "important function." She recently joined House Republicans to ease restrictions on banks. And she offered a decidedly nonpartisan...
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FILE--This undated file photo provided by the Calixto family shows Lucas Calixto. The U.S. Army has reversed its decision to discharge an immigrant recruit who was booted from the military after enlisting with a promised path to citizenship. (Courtesy of the Calixto Family via AP, file)
July 17, 2018 - 6:56 pm
The U.S. Army has reversed its decision to discharge an immigrant reservist who sued when he was booted from the military last month after enlisting with a promised path to citizenship, according to court filings and his attorney. Brazilian immigrant Lucas Calixto filed a lawsuit against the Army...
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In this July 15, 2018, photo, the coach of one of Thailand's Wild Boars soccer teams, Nopparat Kanthawong, right, watches his team play in Mae Sai district in Chiang Rai province, northern Thailand. At least 3 of the 12 boys and coach of another local team who were rescued from a cave in northern Thailand last week are stateless, living in a limbo that puts serious restrictions not only on their upward mobility, but even on their right to travel outside of Chiang Rai, the northern province where they live. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian)
July 16, 2018 - 7:33 pm
MAE SAI, Thailand (AP) — The 12 boys and coach of the Wild Boars soccer team who were rescued from a cave in Thailand last week share a characteristic with many of the professional European clubs its youthful members idolize: They are a multiethnic, cross-border crew. But while the stars of the...
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